Resources

Our staff has taken the time to find a few links to share with you that we think may help you better understand your pet and make the best choices for their wellbeing.

APPOINTMENT

Kitten and Puppy Wellness

Kitten Wellness Care for the First Year of Life

FVRCP
(feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, panleukopenia)​

The first vaccine is given around 6-8 weeks of age and is boostered every 3-4 weeks until the kitten is around 16-20 weeks old, then yearly. This vaccine protects against three serious, potentially life-threatening, and contagious infectious diseases in cats.

Feline Leukemia

The first vaccine is given around 12 weeks (after a FeLeuk/FIV test is performed) and boostered once in 3-4 weeks, then yearly. This vaccine decreases the risk of a virus that can lead to cancer, blood disorders, and a weakened immune system.

Rabies

The first vaccine is given between 12-16 weeks of age and is boostered yearly. Animals are required by state law to be vaccinated against Rabies.

Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Test

This test is a blood test performed once around 12 weeks of age to detect kittens infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency virus.

Fecal Test

Fecal testing is something we recommend on all kittens and puppies annually to check for intestinal parasites that can be easily transmitted between mom and kitten and from cat to cat.

Puppy Wellness Care for the First Year of Life

DAPP (​distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus, parainfluenza)

The first vaccine is given between 6-8 weeks of age. Then it is boostered every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is around 16-20 weeks of age, then it is given yearly. This vaccine protects puppies from four infectious agents that are highly contagious and can cause serious and life-threatening illness in dogs.

Lepto ​(leptospirosis)

The first vaccine is given around 10 weeks of age. Then it is boostered every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is around 16-20 weeks of age, then it is given yearly. This vaccine is often combined with the DAPP vaccine when the puppy becomes old enough for it. This vaccine protects against a serious bacterial infection that causes liver and kidney failure. It is transmitted through the urine of outdoor critters that wander through your yard, ponds, and streams. It can be commonly found in standing water. This disease is zoonotic, meaning it can be transmitted from your pet to you and your family and causes the same disease in humans.

Lyme

The first vaccine is given around 10 weeks of age. Then it is boostered once in 3-4 weeks, then yearly. This vaccine helps to decrease the risk and clinical signs of Lyme disease transmitted through tick bites.

Bordetella​ (kennel cough)

This vaccine is given orally around 8 weeks of age and is boostered yearly. The Bordetella vaccine decreases the likeliness and severity of infectious tracheobronchitis (kennel cough), which causes coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, lethargy and/or inappetence. This vaccine is often required by boarding facilities, grooming facilities, and puppy/obedience classes.

Rabies

The first vaccine is given between 12-16 weeks of age and is boostered yearly. Animals are required by state law to be vaccinated against Rabies.

Heartworm test​

The first heartworm test is performed at 6 weeks of age then yearly to ensure that a puppy is free of heartworm disease and that our preventative program is working appropriately. Please visit ​www.heartwormsociety.org​ for more information on the seriousness of heartworm disease.

Fecal test

Fecal testing is something we recommend on all puppies and dogs annually to check for intestinal parasites that can be easily transmitted between mom and puppy and from dog to dog.